Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, VA

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updated on Tuesday, January 07, 2020

Opening Hours

WednesdayWe
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
ThursdayTh
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
FridayFr
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
SaturdaySa
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
SundaySu
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
MondayMo
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
TuesdayTu
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closed.
Opens in  6 h 37 min.
6 h 37 min

Description

Hours:Tuesday–Saturday 10–5 | Sunday 1–5 (galleries/shop only).
Our collections consist of a wide range of objects, including books and bound serials, Confederate imprints, sheet music, broadsides, newspapers, family and personal papers, business and organizational records, genealogical materials, maps, paintings, prints, postcards, weapons, militaria, glass plate negatives, and 19th–21st century photographs.


Company description
The Virginia Historical Society was founded in 1831. Like most of the nation's older historical societies, it has always been a private organization; one that derives virtually all its support from membership and endowment. At the organizational meeting in 1831, Chief Justice John Marshall was elected its first president, and former president James Madison was elected its first honorary member. During the early years, between 1831 and 1861, the Society acquired valuable books, manuscripts, museum objects, and natural history specimens for its collections. From time to time, it published the texts of historic documents and the addresses delivered at its annual meetings. It was hampered, however, by having virtually no endowment and no permanent home.
During the Civil War, the collections were moved from place to place, with the result that many valuable items disappeared. The whole of the society's endowment, the sum of five thousand dollars, was invested in Confederate bonds, so it, too, was lost.

Five years after the end of the war, in 1870, the Society was reorganized, and efforts were made to reassemble its scattered collections. Temporary quarters were found in the Westmoreland Club building, and the Society, under the direction of its librarian, embarked on a highly ambitious publications program. Eleven volumes of the Collections series were published in as many years, but the venture, having little financial support, brought the Society to virtual bankruptcy. In 1892 new leadership was brought in.
In 2004 the VHS board of trustees announced the 175th Anniversary Campaign: Home for History. The most visible component of this $55 million effort was another new wing completed in early 2006. This $16 million addition of 54, 000 square feet includes a 500-seat auditorium, new exhibition space, a state-of-the-art classroom, and enough space to house the next twenty years' worth of anticipated growth in collections.
Description in a foreign language:
The Virginia Historical Society was founded in 1831. Like most of the nation's older historical societies, it has always been a private organization; one that derives virtually all its support from membership and endowment. At the organizational meeting in 1831, Chief Justice John Marshall was elected its first president, and former president James Madison was elected its first honorary member. During the early years, between 1831 and 1861, the Society acquired valuable books, manuscripts, museum objects, and natural history specimens for its collections. From time to time, it published the texts of historic documents and the addresses delivered at its annual meetings. It was hampered, however, by having virtually no endowment and no permanent home.
During the Civil War, the collections were moved from place to place, with the result that many valuable items disappeared. The whole of the society's endowment, the sum of five thousand dollars, was invested in Confederate bonds, so it, too, was lost.

Five years after the end of the war, in 1870, the Society was reorganized, and efforts were made to reassemble its scattered collections. Temporary quarters were found in the Westmoreland Club building, and the Society, under the direction of its librarian, embarked on a highly ambitious publications program. Eleven volumes of the Collections series were published in as many years, but the venture, having little financial support, brought the Society to virtual bankruptcy. In 1892 new leadership was brought in.
In 2004 the VHS board of trustees announced the 175th Anniversary Campaign: Home for History. The most visible component of this $55 million effort was another new wing completed in early 2006. This $16 million addition of 54, 000 square feet includes a 500-seat auditorium, new exhibition space, a state-of-the-art classroom, and enough space to house the next twenty years' worth of anticipated growth in collections.
Keywords
Books, Publications, Library, Museum, Museum Shop, Reading Rooms, Map, Research, education, Collection, History, Paintings, Photographs, Reproductions, Manuscripts, Exhibition, Education Office, Museum Objects
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